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Eliminating Airborne Contaminants to Ensure and Maintain Good Air Quality in the Workplace is a Major Responsibility of Manufacturers and Plant Owners

Posted by on Jun 20, 2017 in Clean Air Solutions | 0 comments

Records from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) show that more than 4,500 workers lose their lives on the job every year. OSHA’s mission is to prevent workplace deaths, injuries and illnesses by ensuring safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women.

OSHA workplace regulations include, among others, ensuring and maintaining good air quality in the workplace since good air quality is a major contributory factor to worker health and safety. With this, OSHA sees to it that employers, especially manufacturers, are well aware of how important maintaining good air quality in the workplace is. Aside from OSHA regulations, air quality guidelines are also implemented by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). The EPA is a U.S. government agency which was created for the purpose of protecting human health and the environment, while the ACGIH is a 501(c)(3) charitable scientific organization that advances occupational and environmental health.

Recent scientific studies show different kinds of dangers that threaten worker health and safety, especially in manufacturing plants. There are weld fumes, heavy metals, oil mists, silica dust, asbestos fibers and combustible dust, all of which render assuring and maintaining good air quality in these workplaces a really tough challenge.

Despite the difficulty, manufacturers know that eliminating airborne contaminants in order to comply with air quality regulations is their major responsibility. Thus, while a number of them resort to reviewing their engineering processes to see if may be able to remove the obvious sources of contaminants, others have started to implement a dust or weld capture solution.  There are also manufacturers and plant owners who have moved to using the clean air technologies of RoboVent for the collection and filtering of airborne contaminants common in a wide variety of metalworking processes as well as other process systems, particularly those involving wood, paper, chemical, pharmaceutical and food production.

 

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